Zulip Chat Archive

Stream: general

Topic: Guessing the type


view this post on Zulip Alexandru-Andrei Bosinta (Nov 21 2018 at 18:57):

import data.rat
open classical

structure Dedekind_real :=
(carrier : set ℚ)
(nonemp : ∃ a, a ∈ carrier)
(nonrat : ∃ a, a ∉ carrier)
(down : ∀ p ∈ carrier, ∀ q, q ≤ p → q ∈ carrier)
(nomax : ∀ p ∈ carrier, ∃ q, q ∈ carrier ∧ p ≤ q ∧ p ≠ q)

notation `ℝ` := Dedekind_real

instance : has_coe ℝ (set ℚ) := ⟨λ r, r.carrier⟩

namespace Dedekind_real

protected def le (α β : ℝ) : Prop := (α : set ℚ) ⊆ β
instance : has_le ℝ := ⟨Dedekind_real.le⟩

end Dedekind_real

open Dedekind_real

lemma le_total_r : ∀ a b : ℝ, a ≤ b ∨ b ≤ a := λ a b, (em (∃ x, x ∈ a.carrier ∧ x ∉ b.carrier)).elim
sorry (λ h, or.inl (λ x hxa, classical.not_not.1 (not_and.1 ( (@not_exists ℚ _).1 h x) hxa) ) )

/-
lemma le_total_r' : ∀ a b : ℝ, a ≤ b ∨ b ≤ a := λ a b, (em (∃ x, x ∈ a.carrier ∧ x ∉ b.carrier)).elim
sorry (λ h, or.inl (λ x hxa, classical.not_not.1 (not_and.1 ( not_exists.1 h x) hxa) ) )
-/

I am really confused about why the first proof works (for le_total_r), but the second one (commented) doesn't. The second proof gives 2 weird errors, one of which states that Lean is guessing the first thing _ in ( (@not_exists _ _).1 h x) to be a Prop, and then it wants x to be a Prop, but shouldn't it infer the first thing to be because the type of the provided x is ?

view this post on Zulip Simon Hudon (Nov 21 2018 at 20:05):

I'm not sure why there's a difference but interestingly enough, if you write iff.mp not_exists h x instead not_exists.1 h x, the proof works. It suggests that the type inference issue might be related to the . notation.

view this post on Zulip Kevin Buzzard (Nov 21 2018 at 23:04):

So this is not the usual "higher order unification is hard blah blah blah" story?

view this post on Zulip Simon Hudon (Nov 22 2018 at 00:30):

I wouldn't think so but maybe @Gabriel Ebner can enlighten us

view this post on Zulip Gabriel Ebner (Nov 22 2018 at 10:05):

Some other variations work: e.g. if you write (not_exists.1 h x : _) to suppress propagation of the expected type, or if you avoid field notation with iff.mp not_exists h x. A good way to debug these kinds of issues is to 1) minimize the problem a bit and 2) turn various trace options on and stare at the output:

set_option trace.type_context.is_def_eq true
set_option trace.elaborator_detail true
set_option trace.elaborator true
lemma foo (a b : ) (h : ¬∃ (x : ), x  a.carrier  x  b.carrier) (x : ) (hxa : x  a.carrier) :
    ¬(x  a.carrier  x  b.carrier) :=
-- (@not_exists ℚ _).1 h x
-- (not_exists.1 h _ : _)
-- (not_exists.mp h _ : _)
-- (iff.mp not_exists h x)
(not_exists.mp h x)

The offending unfication is here:

[type_context.is_def_eq] (¬∃ (x : ?m_1), ?m_2 x) ↔ ∀ (x : ?m_1), ¬?m_2 x =?= ?m_3 ↔ ?m_4 ... success  (approximate mode)
[type_context.is_def_eq] ¬(x ∈ a.carrier ∧ x ∉ b.carrier) =?= ¬?m_1 ?m_2 ... success  (approximate mode)

view this post on Zulip Gabriel Ebner (Nov 22 2018 at 10:09):

The problem here is that we unify the return type of the field notation application with the expected type before checking the arguments. (In general it's a good idea to first unify the return type with the expected type---this propagates type information from the expected type to the argument types. Consider e.g. id ⟨a,b⟩: in order to elaborate ⟨a,b⟩, we need the type, but we only get that type if we propagate the expected type of id ⟨a,b⟩ to the argument.) The resulting second-order unification problem then does not get the solution we want.

view this post on Zulip Gabriel Ebner (Nov 22 2018 at 10:11):

The reason this only happens for the field notation case is that field notations are elaborated in two steps. Essentially not_exists.mp h x is elaborated as (iff.mp not_exists : _) h x (which also fails).
If you write e.g. iff.mp not_exists h x then the return type of iff.mp is ?m_1 ↔ ?m_2 which does not induce a problematic second-order unification problem.


Last updated: May 10 2021 at 23:11 UTC