mathlib documentation

data.num.bitwise

Bitwise operations using binary representation of integers

Definitions

Bitwise "or" for pos_num.

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def pos_num.land  :

Bitwise "and" for pos_num.

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def pos_num.ldiff  :

Bitwise λ a b, a && !b for pos_num. For example, ldiff 5 9 = 4:

101

1001


100
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def pos_num.lxor  :

Bitwise "xor" for pos_num.

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def pos_num.test_bit  :
pos_numbool

a.test_bit n is tt iff the n-th bit (starting from the LSB) in the binary representation of a is active. If the size of a is less than n, this evaluates to ff.

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def pos_num.one_bits  :

n.one_bits 0 is the list of indices of active bits in the binary representation of n.

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def pos_num.shiftl  :

Left-shift the binary representation of a pos_num.

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def pos_num.shiftr  :
pos_numnum

Right-shift the binary representation of a pos_num.

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def num.lor  :
numnumnum

Bitwise "or" for num.

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def num.land  :
numnumnum

Bitwise "and" for num.

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def num.ldiff  :
numnumnum

Bitwise λ a b, a && !b for num. For example, ldiff 5 9 = 4:

101

1001


100
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def num.lxor  :
numnumnum

Bitwise "xor" for num.

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def num.shiftl  :
numnum

Left-shift the binary representation of a num.

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def num.shiftr  :
numnum

Right-shift the binary representation of a pos_num.

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def num.test_bit  :
numbool

a.test_bit n is tt iff the n-th bit (starting from the LSB) in the binary representation of a is active. If the size of a is less than n, this evaluates to ff.

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def num.one_bits  :

n.one_bits is the list of indices of active bits in the binary representation of n.

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@[instance]

inductive nzsnum  :
Type

This is a nonzero (and "non minus one") version of snum. See the documentation of snum for more details.

@[instance]

inductive snum  :
Type

Alternative representation of integers using a sign bit at the end. The convention on sign here is to have the argument to msb denote the sign of the MSB itself, with all higher bits set to the negation of this sign. The result is interpreted in two's complement.

13  = ..0001101(base 2) = nz (bit1 (bit0 (bit1 (msb tt))))
-13 = ..1110011(base 2) = nz (bit1 (bit1 (bit0 (msb ff))))

As with num, a special case must be added for zero, which has no msb, but by two's complement symmetry there is a second special case for -1. Here the bool field indicates the sign of the number.

0  = ..0000000(base 2) = zero ff
-1 = ..1111111(base 2) = zero tt
@[instance]

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@[instance]

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@[instance]

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@[instance]

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@[instance]

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@[instance]

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The snum representation uses a bit string, essentially a list of 0 (ff) and 1 (tt) bits, and the negation of the MSB is sign-extended to all higher bits.

def nzsnum.sign  :

Sign of a nzsnum.

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def nzsnum.not  :

Bitwise not for nzsnum.

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def nzsnum.bit0  :

Add an inactive bit at the end of a nzsnum. This mimics pos_num.bit0.

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def nzsnum.bit1  :

Add an active bit at the end of a nzsnum. This mimics pos_num.bit1.

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def nzsnum.head  :

The head of a nzsnum is the boolean value of its LSB.

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def nzsnum.tail  :

The tail of a nzsnum is the snum obtained by removing the LSB. Edge cases: tail 1 = 0 and tail (-2) = -1.

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def snum.sign  :

Sign of a snum.

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def snum.not  :

Bitwise not for snum.

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def snum.bit  :
boolsnumsnum

Add a bit at the end of a snum. This mimics nzsnum.bit.

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def snum.bit0  :

Add an inactive bit at the end of a snum. This mimics znum.bit0.

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def snum.bit1  :

Add an active bit at the end of a snum. This mimics znum.bit1.

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theorem snum.bit_zero (b : bool) :

theorem snum.bit_one (b : bool) :

def nzsnum.drec' {C : snumSort u_1} (z : Π (b : bool), C (snum.zero b)) (s : Π (b : bool) (p : snum), C pC (b :: p)) (p : nzsnum) :
C p

A dependent induction principle for nzsnum, with base cases 0 : snum and (-1) : snum.

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def snum.head  :

The head of a snum is the boolean value of its LSB.

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def snum.tail  :

The tail of a snum is obtained by removing the LSB. Edge cases: tail 1 = 0, tail (-2) = -1, tail 0 = 0 and tail (-1) = -1.

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def snum.drec' {C : snumSort u_1} (z : Π (b : bool), C (snum.zero b)) (s : Π (b : bool) (p : snum), C pC (b :: p)) (p : snum) :
C p

A dependent induction principle for snum which avoids relying on nzsnum.

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def snum.rec' {α : Sort u_1} :
(bool → α)(boolsnumα → α)snum → α

An induction principle for snum which avoids relying on nzsnum.

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def snum.test_bit  :
snumbool

snum.test_bit n a is tt iff the n-th bit (starting from the LSB) of a is active. If the size of a is less than n, this evaluates to ff.

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def snum.succ  :

The successor of a snum (i.e. the operation adding one).

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def snum.pred  :

The predecessor of a snum (i.e. the operation of removing one).

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def snum.neg  :

The opposite of a snum.

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@[instance]

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def snum.czadd  :
boolboolsnumsnum

snum.czadd a b n is n + a - b (where a and b should be read as either 0 or 1). This is useful to implement the carry system in cadd.

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def snum.bits (a : snum) (n : ) :

a.bits n is the vector of the n first bits of a (starting from the LSB).

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def snum.cadd  :
snumsnumboolsnum

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def snum.add  :
snumsnumsnum

Add two snums.

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@[instance]

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def snum.sub  :
snumsnumsnum

Substract two snums.

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@[instance]

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def snum.mul  :
snumsnumsnum

Multiply two snums.

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@[instance]

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