mathlib documentation

tactic.mk_iff_of_inductive_prop

mk_iff_of_inductive_prop

This file defines a tactic tactic.mk_iff_of_inductive_prop that generates iff rules for inductive Props. For example, when applied to list.chain, it creates a declaration with the following type:

{α : Type*} (R : α  α  Prop) (a : α) (l : list α),
  chain R a l  l = []  {b : α} {l' : list α}, R a b  chain R b l  l = b :: l'

This tactic can be called using either the mk_iff_of_inductive_prop user command or the mk_iff attribute.

meta def mk_iff.select  :
tactic unit

select m n runs tactic.right m times, and then tactic.left (n-m) times. Fails if n < m.

compact_relation bs as_ps: Produce a relation of the form:

R as :=  bs, Λ_i a_i = p_i[bs]

This relation is user-visible, so we compact it by removing each b_j where a p_i = b_j, and hence a_i = b_j. We need to take care when there are p_i and p_j with p_i = p_j = b_k.

TODO: this is a variant of compact_relation in coinductive_predicates.lean, export it there.

@[nolint]
meta def mk_iff.constr_to_prop (univs : list level) (g idxs : list expr) (c : name) :

@[nolint]

def mk_iff.list_option_merge {α : Type u_1} {β : Type u_2} :
list (option α)list βlist (option β)

Iterate over two lists, if the first element of the first list is none, insert none into the result and continue with the tail of first list. Otherwise, wrap the first element of the second list with some and continue with the tails of both lists. Return when either list is empty.

Example:

list_option_merge [none, some (), none, some ()] [0, 1, 2, 3, 4] = [none, (some 0), none, (some 1)]
Equations
@[nolint]
meta def mk_iff.to_inductive (cs : list name) (gs : list expr) (s : list (list (option expr) × (expr ))) (h : expr) :

mk_iff_of_inductive_prop i r makes an iff rule for the inductively-defined proposition i. The new rule r has the shape ∀ps is, i as ↔ ⋁_j, ∃cs, is = cs, where ps are the type parameters, is are the indices, j ranges over all possible constructors, the cs are the parameters for each of the constructors, and the equalities is = cs are the instantiations for each constructor for each of the indices to the inductive type i.

In each case, we remove constructor parameters (i.e. cs) when the corresponding equality would be just c = i for some index i.

For example, mk_iff_of_inductive_prop on list.chain produces:

 {α : Type*} (R : α  α  Prop) (a : α) (l : list α),
  chain R a l  l = []  {b : α} {l' : list α}, R a b  chain R b l  l = b :: l'
meta def mk_iff_of_inductive_prop_cmd (_x : interactive.parse (lean.parser.tk "mk_iff_of_inductive_prop")) :

mk_iff_of_inductive_prop i r makes an iff rule for the inductively-defined proposition i. The new rule r has the shape ∀ps is, i as ↔ ⋁_j, ∃cs, is = cs, where ps are the type parameters, is are the indices, j ranges over all possible constructors, the cs are the parameters for each of the constructors, and the equalities is = cs are the instantiations for each constructor for each of the indices to the inductive type i.

In each case, we remove constructor parameters (i.e. cs) when the corresponding equality would be just c = i for some index i.

For example, mk_iff_of_inductive_prop on list.chain produces:

 {α : Type*} (R : α  α  Prop) (a : α) (l : list α),
  chain R a l  l = []  {b : α} {l' : list α}, R a b  chain R b l  l = b :: l'

See also the mk_iff user attribute.

Applying the mk_iff attribute to an inductively-defined proposition mk_iff makes an iff rule r with the shape ∀ps is, i as ↔ ⋁_j, ∃cs, is = cs, where ps are the type parameters, is are the indices, j ranges over all possible constructors, the cs are the parameters for each of the constructors, and the equalities is = cs are the instantiations for each constructor for each of the indices to the inductive type i.

In each case, we remove constructor parameters (i.e. cs) when the corresponding equality would be just c = i for some index i.

For example, if we try the following:

@[mk_iff] structure foo (m n : ) : Prop :=
(equal : m = n)
(sum_eq_two : m + n = 2)

Then #check foo_iff returns:

foo_iff :  (m n : ), foo m n  m = n  m + n = 2

You can add an optional string after mk_iff to change the name of the generated lemma. For example, if we try the following:

@[mk_iff bar] structure foo (m n : ) : Prop :=
(equal : m = n)
(sum_eq_two : m + n = 2)

Then #check bar returns:

bar :  (m n : ), foo m n  m = n  m + n = 2

See also the user command mk_iff_of_inductive_prop.