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geometry.euclidean.monge_point

Monge point and orthocenter

This file defines the orthocenter of a triangle, via its n-dimensional generalization, the Monge point of a simplex.

Main definitions

References

def affine.simplex.monge_point {V : Type u_1} {P : Type u_2} [inner_product_space V] [metric_space P] [normed_add_torsor V P] {n : } :

The Monge point of a simplex (in 2 or more dimensions) is a generalization of the orthocenter of a triangle. It is defined to be the intersection of the Monge planes, where a Monge plane is the (n-1)-dimensional affine subspace of the subspace spanned by the simplex that passes through the centroid of an (n-2)-dimensional face and is orthogonal to the opposite edge (in 2 dimensions, this is the same as an altitude). The circumcenter O, centroid G and Monge point M are collinear in that order on the Euler line, with OG : GM = (n-1) : 2. Here, we use that ratio to define the Monge point (so resulting in a point that equals the centroid in 0 or 1 dimensions), and then show in subsequent lemmas that the point so defined lies in the Monge planes and is their unique point of intersection.

Equations

The position of the Monge point in relation to the circumcenter and centroid.

The Monge point lies in the affine span.

theorem affine.simplex.monge_point_eq_of_range_eq {V : Type u_1} {P : Type u_2} [inner_product_space V] [metric_space P] [normed_add_torsor V P] {n : } {s₁ s₂ : affine.simplex P n} :

Two simplices with the same points have the same Monge point.

The weights for the Monge point of an (n+2)-simplex, minus the centroid of an n-dimensional face, in terms of points_with_circumcenter. This definition is only valid when i₁ ≠ i₂.

Equations

monge_point_vsub_face_centroid_weights_with_circumcenter is the result of subtracting centroid_weights_with_circumcenter from monge_point_weights_with_circumcenter.

@[simp]

monge_point_vsub_face_centroid_weights_with_circumcenter sums to 0.

The Monge point of an (n+2)-simplex, minus the centroid of an n-dimensional face, in terms of points_with_circumcenter.

theorem affine.simplex.inner_monge_point_vsub_face_centroid_vsub {V : Type u_1} {P : Type u_2} [inner_product_space V] [metric_space P] [normed_add_torsor V P] {n : } (s : affine.simplex P (n + 2)) {i₁ i₂ : fin (n + 3)} :
i₁ i₂inner (s.monge_point -ᵥ finset.centroid {i₁, i₂} s.points) (s.points i₁ -ᵥ s.points i₂) = 0

The Monge point of an (n+2)-simplex, minus the centroid of an n-dimensional face, is orthogonal to the difference of the two vertices not in that face.

def affine.simplex.monge_plane {V : Type u_1} {P : Type u_2} [inner_product_space V] [metric_space P] [normed_add_torsor V P] {n : } :
affine.simplex P (n + 2)fin (n + 3)fin (n + 3)affine_subspace P

A Monge plane of an (n+2)-simplex is the (n+1)-dimensional affine subspace of the subspace spanned by the simplex that passes through the centroid of an n-dimensional face and is orthogonal to the opposite edge (in 2 dimensions, this is the same as an altitude). This definition is only intended to be used when i₁ ≠ i₂.

Equations
theorem affine.simplex.monge_plane_def {V : Type u_1} {P : Type u_2} [inner_product_space V] [metric_space P] [normed_add_torsor V P] {n : } (s : affine.simplex P (n + 2)) (i₁ i₂ : fin (n + 3)) :

The definition of a Monge plane.

theorem affine.simplex.monge_plane_comm {V : Type u_1} {P : Type u_2} [inner_product_space V] [metric_space P] [normed_add_torsor V P] {n : } (s : affine.simplex P (n + 2)) (i₁ i₂ : fin (n + 3)) :
s.monge_plane i₁ i₂ = s.monge_plane i₂ i₁

The Monge plane associated with vertices i₁ and i₂ equals that associated with i₂ and i₁.

theorem affine.simplex.monge_point_mem_monge_plane {V : Type u_1} {P : Type u_2} [inner_product_space V] [metric_space P] [normed_add_torsor V P] {n : } (s : affine.simplex P (n + 2)) {i₁ i₂ : fin (n + 3)} :
i₁ i₂s.monge_point s.monge_plane i₁ i₂

The Monge point lies in the Monge planes.

theorem affine.simplex.direction_monge_plane {V : Type u_1} {P : Type u_2} [inner_product_space V] [metric_space P] [normed_add_torsor V P] {n : } (s : affine.simplex P (n + 2)) {i₁ i₂ : fin (n + 3)} :

The direction of a Monge plane.

theorem affine.simplex.eq_monge_point_of_forall_mem_monge_plane {V : Type u_1} {P : Type u_2} [inner_product_space V] [metric_space P] [normed_add_torsor V P] {n : } {s : affine.simplex P (n + 2)} {i₁ : fin (n + 3)} {p : P} :
(∀ (i₂ : fin (n + 3)), i₁ i₂p s.monge_plane i₁ i₂)p = s.monge_point

The Monge point is the only point in all the Monge planes from any one vertex.

def affine.simplex.altitude {V : Type u_1} {P : Type u_2} [inner_product_space V] [metric_space P] [normed_add_torsor V P] {n : } :
affine.simplex P (n + 1)fin (n + 2)affine_subspace P

An altitude of a simplex is the line that passes through a vertex and is orthogonal to the opposite face.

Equations

The definition of an altitude.

theorem affine.simplex.mem_altitude {V : Type u_1} {P : Type u_2} [inner_product_space V] [metric_space P] [normed_add_torsor V P] {n : } (s : affine.simplex P (n + 1)) (i : fin (n + 2)) :

A vertex lies in the corresponding altitude.

The direction of an altitude.

The vector span of the opposite face lies in the direction orthogonal to an altitude.

@[instance]

An altitude is finite-dimensional.

@[simp]
theorem affine.simplex.findim_direction_altitude {V : Type u_1} {P : Type u_2} [inner_product_space V] [metric_space P] [normed_add_torsor V P] {n : } (s : affine.simplex P (n + 1)) (i : fin (n + 2)) :

An altitude is one-dimensional (i.e., a line).

A line through a vertex is the altitude through that vertex if and only if it is orthogonal to the opposite face.

def affine.triangle.orthocenter {V : Type u_1} {P : Type u_2} [inner_product_space V] [metric_space P] [normed_add_torsor V P] :

The orthocenter of a triangle is the intersection of its altitudes. It is defined here as the 2-dimensional case of the Monge point.

Equations

The orthocenter equals the Monge point.

The position of the orthocenter in relation to the circumcenter and centroid.

The orthocenter lies in the affine span.

theorem affine.triangle.orthocenter_eq_of_range_eq {V : Type u_1} {P : Type u_2} [inner_product_space V] [metric_space P] [normed_add_torsor V P] {t₁ t₂ : affine.triangle P} :

Two triangles with the same points have the same orthocenter.

theorem affine.triangle.altitude_eq_monge_plane {V : Type u_1} {P : Type u_2} [inner_product_space V] [metric_space P] [normed_add_torsor V P] (t : affine.triangle P) {i₁ i₂ i₃ : fin 3} :
i₁ i₂i₁ i₃i₂ i₃affine.simplex.altitude t i₁ = affine.simplex.monge_plane t i₂ i₃

In the case of a triangle, altitudes are the same thing as Monge planes.

The orthocenter lies in the altitudes.

theorem affine.triangle.eq_orthocenter_of_forall_mem_altitude {V : Type u_1} {P : Type u_2} [inner_product_space V] [metric_space P] [normed_add_torsor V P] {t : affine.triangle P} {i₁ i₂ : fin 3} {p : P} :
i₁ i₂p affine.simplex.altitude t i₁p affine.simplex.altitude t i₂p = t.orthocenter

The orthocenter is the only point lying in any two of the altitudes.

The distance from the orthocenter to the reflection of the circumcenter in a side equals the circumradius.

The distance from the orthocenter to the reflection of the circumcenter in a side equals the circumradius, variant using a finset.

The affine span of the orthocenter and a vertex is contained in the altitude.

theorem affine.triangle.altitude_replace_orthocenter_eq_affine_span {V : Type u_1} {P : Type u_2} [inner_product_space V] [metric_space P] [normed_add_torsor V P] {t₁ t₂ : affine.triangle P} {i₁ i₂ i₃ j₁ j₂ j₃ : fin 3} :
i₁ i₂i₁ i₃i₂ i₃j₁ j₂j₁ j₃j₂ j₃t₂.points j₁ = t₁.orthocentert₂.points j₂ = t₁.points i₂t₂.points j₃ = t₁.points i₃affine.simplex.altitude t₂ j₂ = affine_span {t₁.points i₁, t₁.points i₂}

Suppose we are given a triangle t₁, and replace one of its vertices by its orthocenter, yielding triangle t₂ (with vertices not necessarily listed in the same order). Then an altitude of t₂ from a vertex that was not replaced is the corresponding side of t₁.

theorem affine.triangle.orthocenter_replace_orthocenter_eq_point {V : Type u_1} {P : Type u_2} [inner_product_space V] [metric_space P] [normed_add_torsor V P] {t₁ t₂ : affine.triangle P} {i₁ i₂ i₃ j₁ j₂ j₃ : fin 3} :
i₁ i₂i₁ i₃i₂ i₃j₁ j₂j₁ j₃j₂ j₃t₂.points j₁ = t₁.orthocentert₂.points j₂ = t₁.points i₂t₂.points j₃ = t₁.points i₃t₂.orthocenter = t₁.points i₁

Suppose we are given a triangle t₁, and replace one of its vertices by its orthocenter, yielding triangle t₂ (with vertices not necessarily listed in the same order). Then the orthocenter of t₂ is the vertex of t₁ that was replaced.

def euclidean_geometry.orthocentric_system {V : Type u_1} {P : Type u_2} [inner_product_space V] [metric_space P] [normed_add_torsor V P] :
set P → Prop

Four points form an orthocentric system if they consist of the vertices of a triangle and its orthocenter.

Equations
theorem euclidean_geometry.exists_of_range_subset_orthocentric_system {V : Type u_1} {P : Type u_2} [inner_product_space V] [metric_space P] [normed_add_torsor V P] {t : affine.triangle P} (ho : t.orthocenter set.range t.points) {p : fin 3 → P} :
set.range p insert t.orthocenter (set.range t.points)function.injective p(∃ (i₁ i₂ i₃ j₂ j₃ : fin 3), i₁ i₂ i₁ i₃ i₂ i₃ (∀ (i : fin 3), i = i₁ i = i₂ i = i₃) p i₁ = t.orthocenter j₂ j₃ t.points j₂ = p i₂ t.points j₃ = p i₃) set.range p = set.range t.points

This is an auxiliary lemma giving information about the relation of two triangles in an orthocentric system; it abstracts some reasoning, with no geometric content, that is common to some other lemmas. Suppose the orthocentric system is generated by triangle t, and we are given three points p in the orthocentric system. Then either we can find indices i₁, i₂ and i₃ for p such that p i₁ is the orthocenter of t and p i₂ and p i₃ are points j₂ and j₃ of t, or p has the same points as t.

For any three points in an orthocentric system generated by triangle t, there is a point in the subspace spanned by the triangle from which the distance of all those three points equals the circumradius.

Any three points in an orthocentric system are affinely independent.

Any three points in an orthocentric system span the same subspace as the whole orthocentric system.

All triangles in an orthocentric system have the same circumradius.

Given any triangle in an orthocentric system, the fourth point is its orthocenter.